Plant Monarch habitat or risk consequences | Monarch butterfly | Endangered Species Act | Michigan Farm News

Plant Monarch habitat or risk consequences

Category: Crops

by Cyndie Shearing, AFBF

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Voluntary efforts to establish and restore monarch habitat could lead to reversing population losses, potentially rendering an Endangered Species listing unnecessary.

The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) is part of the Keystone Collaborative, which is helping support a new campaign, Farmers for Monarchs.

This broad-based collaboration aimed at addressing on-farm conservation efforts was launched at Commodity Classic (Feb. 27-March 1), America’s largest farmer-led convention and trade show.

This unprecedented, united effort by farmers, ranchers, landowners, the agriculture industry and conservation groups seeks to encourage and enable the voluntary expansion and establishment of habitat that will support monarchs and other pollinators and increase biodiversity across our landscape.

The initiative includes planting milkweed, nectar flowers and other suitable habitat with particular focus on areas within the monarch butterfly migration route in North America.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is evaluating monarch conservation efforts along the migration route. In June 2019, it will determine its final listing decision for the monarch and, possibly, its habitat, under the Endangered Species Act. A listing could potentially impact the way farmers manage their land. Voluntary efforts to establish and restore monarch habitat could lead to reversing population losses, potentially rendering a listing unnecessary.

See the Farmers for Monarchs one-pager or visit farmersformonarchs.org for details.

Industry, commodity and non-governmental organizations partnering with AFBF on this initiative include: American Soybean Association, BASF, Bayer, The Bee & Butterfly Habitat Fund, Dow AgroSciences/DuPont/Pioneer, Monarch Watch, Monsanto, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Corn Growers Association, Saint Louis Zoo, Sand County Foundation and Syngenta.